Premiere Address, Premium Building

Nestled in bustling St. Michaels, Town Center St Michaels is poised to be the town’s beacon and central landmark. The luxury fit-out and finishes will become its hallmark and attract the well-heeled and sophisticated.

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St. Michaels

One of USA Today’s Top 10 Best Small Coastal Towns, St Michaels is within a few hours drive of Washington D.C., Philadelphia and New Jersey. St. Michaels is a quaint historic town with a beautiful harbor, exceptional dining, and one of a kind shopping.

Dining

St. Michaels is a Foodie heaven.  Nationally and state ranked eateries for Fine Dining, Casual Dining,Waterfront Dining, Crab Houses, Coffee Houses and Ice Cream Parlors are available to satisfy the pallets of discerning travelers.

Shopping

Some of the finest estate and custom Jewelry in the region along with amazing home designers in St. Michaels offering home and accessory stores for all styles and tastes. The range of shopping includes Apparel, Antiques, Art, Specialty Foods, and Fine Wines.

Attractions

Time in St. Michaels can be filled with a variety of activities from fishing, boating, sailing, historical or cocktail cruises, visit to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, shopping, kayaking, biking or just relaxing around a pool with a good book. The quaint town is historic, but laid back and very pet friendly.

The Site

Town Center St Michaels, with a prominent address on Talbot Street, is firmly set in the middle of the action. Shopping and unique dining is available by stepping out the front door. The nationally-known Chesapeake Maritime Museum is a 15 minute walk or 5 five minute drive. While the waterfront and marinas are a short distance away,  golf courses and other leisure activities such as charter boats are within a 10 minute drive. It really is an ideal location to spend a relaxing week or longer.

PHASE I – RETAIL

 

Artist Renderings.

The architectural design takes it cues from the surrounding vernacular. Large windows and sun shade canopies at ground level welcome customers to the retail space. 

Street Scape

Engaging the street on a pedestian level, outdoor dining and awnings invite visitors to take a break from the sun and regroup to enjoy some of the best food shopping on the Eastern Shore.

Scale

The building scale pays respect to the surounding fabric of the town. The low building height and sesitivity of building materials engage the town without dominating.

Sq Ft Retail Space

Minutes to Philadelphia

Private Parking

Hours to New York

Minutes Drive to DC

Retail

Over 15,000 sq ft of unencumbered retail space makes a great location for one or multiple businesses.

PHASE II – Luxury Lodging

 

Artist Renderings.

 

The architectural design takes it cues from the surrounding vernacular. Large windows on the ground level welcome customers to the retail space. Generous, private balconies give tenants outside space above the bustle of Talbot Street.

Street Scape

The building engages the street on a pedestian level. Outdoor dining and awnings invite visitors to take a break from the sun and enjoy some of the best food shopping in the area.

Scale

The building scale pays respect to the surounding fabric of the town. The low building height and sesitivity of building materials engage the town without dominating.

Privacy

Lodging enjoys the benefits of private entrances and Parisian balconies. These allow for discrete entry while enjoying views without the hassles of the bustle below respectively.

Luxury Lodging

Up to thirteen luxury lodging units with high-end finishes will wrap the building. The units along the street front feature balconies that afford a connection to the town but with privacy.

Luxury Apartments

Private Parking

Hours to New York

Minutes to Philadelphia

Minutes Drive to DC

Star Democrat Newspaper - Old ACME Building Will Be New Town Center

By CHRIS POLK cpolk@stardem.com

    • ST. MICHAELS — The new, renovated ACME building will have two stories, upstairs apartments with balconies looking down on Talbot Street and an outdoor, upstairs courtyard — all in keeping with its surroundings, according to architect Tim Crosby and owner Bob Hockaday, who presented schematic drawings to the St. Michaels Historic District Commission on Thursday, May 3. In architectural references, it is being called the “St. Michaels Town Center.” Last fall, the St. Michaels ACME closed, leaving no in-town grocery store for residents. The decision to close the store by the ACME Corporation had been irrevocable, despite the efforts of townsfolk. After it became clear that no other grocery chain was interested in doing business there, local businessman and developer Bob Hockaday and his wife took out a contract and ultimately purchased the building. “It’s a daunting task to design a building of this size in an historic district, and we have to pay attention to scale, proportion — all of those things we derive from the context. And in the end, the building is supposed to be a contributor to the historic district,” Crosby said. “Something that adds a modern conversation and we think this does it.” Crosby said his group had taken guidelines from Point Nine of the Secretary of the Interior’s recommendation for infill projects in historic districts when they worked on the design. That premise is construction should not imitate historic structures, but nevertheless relate to them through proportions and other details. “The proportions are set off of what we found to be the most prevalent proportions in the historic district,” Crosby said. There are many historic two-story buildings nearby. The existing ACME building’s height is 17 feet 4 inches compared to the height of the new building, which will be 34 feet, 8 inches, Crosby said. Historic District Commission member Pete Lesher said it had been noted in the town’s Talbot Street architectural guidelines that the original ACME building had been built in 1960 and was “not compatible with the character historic area.” The guidelines added that the business was a major contributor to the town and should remain in place until it could be located to a business district. The guidelines also suggested the replacement be a two-story building in keeping with surrounding structures, Lesher said. Crosby said the Talbot Street side of the new building’s downstairs is designed to accommodate as many as five storefronts across the front, if need be, without needing to modify the structure whatsoever. There is also the possibility that the bottom of the building could contain one large business. “My wife and I made the decision in the best interests of the town that we are going to wait as long as humanly possible in order to beat the bushes hard to put some type of market concept inside this building,” Hockaday said. “That’s our goal. And it will cost some money to us, but … as I told numerous people, we both buy bread, milk and eggs just like everybody body else,” he said. Hockaday co-owns Guilford & Company across the street and said he has ample opportunities to look at the ACME building out of his store window and imagine what could be done. He also instructed the architects at Crosby and Associates to allow for different configurations because he did not know who the tenants of the St. Michaels Town Center were going to be. “There’s a lot of ideas floating around,” he said. “But our main goal is to be as flexible as possible.” “One of the things that Bob and Julie wanted to recognize is that Fremont Street is an important street in and of itself,” Crosby said of the Hockadays. “So we are treating the building, design-wise, as if it has two fronts.” “The support side is of course on Talbot,” he said. “But we are bringing a piece of the Talbot side to the rear.” So the new St. Michaels Town Center also will face Fremont Street, with its cozy businesses and the St. Michaels Branch of the Talbot County Free Library. Crosby showed a night view of the St. Michaels Town Center to the group, with the building’s facades illuminated by accent lights.

“We think the building should contribute 24 hours a day and you can see the lighting is very important to us,” he said.

    • There’s even a place sometimes for whimsy. He said with every historic storefront, there is an underlying steel structure, and in the case of the St. Michaels Town Center those steel beams would be intentionally exposed and “made beautiful.” On the second floor, large windows have a shroud, or hood on top, and Crosby said he could imagine people standing in the outdoor courtyard space and looking out the second door balcony French doors at events such as the wine festival or some of the town’s numerous events on Talbot Street. Hockaday said it was a minor point, but he did not want anyone to think the balconies upstairs would be large enough to put a chair on, and there would be no accumulation of furniture. “It’s basically a door you can open and lean out,” Hockaday said. “The maximum depth of the balconies are 18 inches,” Crosby said. “You can’t sit there, but you can stand there and enjoy the street.” There is also an elevator shaft that will allow the movements of the elevator to be seen from the street, as noted by commission member Glenn Fong, who was absent but sent in his comments. Crosby said white was chosen because “a white building has less visual weight” than a deeper color. “And we know we are building a two-story building and we want to try to be able to take every step we can to make it so it isn’t this big brute standing on the edge,” he said. The architects were instructed to hide utility structures, such as disguising the building’s HVAC unit behind a “vegetative screen.” Crosby said Hockaday requested that there would be no overhead wires showing, and extra effort will be taken to run the wires underground. “To take that one step further, I do not want any exposed meters,” Hockaday said. “I want them all to be in meter rooms. We’ve been able to negotiate that with Choptank.” Hockaday said right now, the second floor is scheduled to be residential, with about 7,500 square feet as office space, pending zoning negotiations. “I think anything that changes that building as it is now couldn’t be anything but an improvement,” said Janet Schilling, a resident of Cherry Street. “I’m looking forward to seeing some change there.” “I think it’s a great project,” Langley Shook said. “I think it will be a wonderful addition to the town.” He urged the commission members to support it. Lesher said he was particularly gratified because earlier this year, Crosby and Associates had appeared before the commission, gathered comments and incorporated just about all of the commission’s suggestions in their design. “I’m very impressed to the overall impression of this structure with the way it speaks to the streetscape, the way it improves the vision of the street,” he said. Lesher said the current ACME building is a long, horizontal building with long, horizontal windows. The new design breaks up the space better, he said. He also praised windows, lighting, building materials, and the treatments of the Fremont Street facade and sides. “This is really different,” said commission member James Fulton, adding that he also was impressed, especially with the flexibility of the building and the treatment of the Fremont Street side. “This is going to be a real signature building. It’s going to change the character of that part of Talbot Street,” he said. Commission member Walda du Priest also approved. “I think it’s going to be stunning,” she said. Each set of details for the building were discussed and approved by the St. Michaels Historic District Commission in several motions. Lesher said other details, such as signage, would be discussed and voted upon by the commission at future meetings as plans move forward. Historic District Commission members Walda du Priest, Pete Lesher, Marie Martin and James Fulton were present for the meeting and voted unanimously in favor of each motion. Member Glenn Fong was absent. On property records, the ACME building was built in 1959 and is 14,960 square feet, zoned commercial, and located on 36,120 square feet of property. The new building will retain the same footprint